The Princess Mononoke stage adaptation has opened in London to sell-out performances and rave reviews. The play’s puppets and costumes are made out of recycled material, reflecting Miyazaki’s environmental message. 

OH MY GOD

BRILLIANT

Posted on April/29/2013 With 42,260 notes
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iguanamouth:

ok i’ve hit a thousand followers because of some bad decisions and i guess it’s time to do one of these WOW

IGUANAMOUTH’S 1000TH FOLLOWER GIVEAWAY 

PRIZES

RULES

if you have an questions its probably because im shitty at explaining but feel free to drop me a line

HAVE FUN

Posted on January/30/2013 With 657 notes
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patriciaalvarado:

pt. 1 of a series entitled “I thought you said you liked long hair…”
women in our society grow up believing that body hair is unnatural, and that the removal of hair is a ritualistic practice to be done as often as possible. we see ads for shaving creams featuring long, lean, hairless legs being caressed by a man. we see hairy women being automatically labeled as man hating feminists or as being unkempt, dirty, and lazy. we want women to look like girls; hairless, fresh, clean, and new. we’re scared of aging, of growth, of change, and so we shave, and we wax, and we pluck. body hair makes society cringe, and so we put in the work. 
In “I thought you said you liked long hair…” I attempt to address the problematic ways in which society views hair. Long hair is the ideal, but only if it’s in the right place. So to the countless men who have told me that they prefer women with long hair, you’re getting what you’ve asked for.
© Patricia Ann Alvarado 

patriciaalvarado:

pt. 1 of a series entitled “I thought you said you liked long hair…”

women in our society grow up believing that body hair is unnatural, and that the removal of hair is a ritualistic practice to be done as often as possible. we see ads for shaving creams featuring long, lean, hairless legs being caressed by a man. we see hairy women being automatically labeled as man hating feminists or as being unkempt, dirty, and lazy. we want women to look like girls; hairless, fresh, clean, and new. we’re scared of aging, of growth, of change, and so we shave, and we wax, and we pluck. body hair makes society cringe, and so we put in the work. 

In “I thought you said you liked long hair…” I attempt to address the problematic ways in which society views hair. Long hair is the ideal, but only if it’s in the right place. So to the countless men who have told me that they prefer women with long hair, you’re getting what you’ve asked for.

© Patricia Ann Alvarado 

Posted on November/11/2012 With 11,438 notes
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I Want To Be Blonde

 http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/500/83360831/Laura+Marling+PNG.png

http://www.u-skill.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/tavi19.jpg

 I’ve got a history with blonde. My mother, a former model, looks like Rapunzel. When my little sister was born, my mom’s golden-colored hair curled down to her butt. My sister is strawberry blonde, and both of my best friends who I’ve known since kindergarten are blonde. My favorite singer is blonde, my first boyfriend’s girlfriend before me was blonde, and my current boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend was blonde. Every girl that my ex-boyfriend hooked up with when he moved away to college seemed to be blonde, and his girlfriend after me was blonde, too. So, blonde and I have this thing.

I was born with dark brown hair and dark brown eyes. I dye my hair black because I think it looks exciting, and I’ve had pink hair, green hair, blue hair, and purple hair. But the one color I could never pull off was blonde.

I just don’t have the skin for it. I’m half Hispanic, and even though I’m pretty pale, blonde turns my olive-y skin grey. I don’t have the hair for it either. If I dyed my hair blonde, I would have dark roots in two days, and horses would try to chew on the ends.

This is secretly infuriating. I have always wanted to be blonde.

I’m not sure why. If I combine the sublime beauty I see in my mother, with the prepubescent angst I felt in middle school because I was the dark chubby friend and my best friends were the light skinny friends, with the insecurity I felt toward those ex-girlfriends (who always seem to be perfect in our minds), with the cool nose-ring/long skirt/messy blonde hair/college girl combo, I think I get closer to an answer. But I don’t think it’s all there…

It’s a very subtle belief in our society, but blonde is prettier. Let’s be real. I’m not saying it’s true. But it is a stereotype that influences our media. Scandinavian child-models, the blonde-haired blue-eyed all-American girl next door, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel in Tangled (who all had dark-haired, evil women controlling them) it’s there and it’s really, really subtle. Blonde is beautiful, and brunette is sexy. (Or…evil). Voluptuous exotic women; Bettie Paige, Angelina Jolie (who was at one point voluptuous), Megan Fox, their dark hair shrouds them in maturity and mystery.

This isn’t true in the media all the time (there are plenty of women who are blonde and “sexy,” and plenty of delicate brunette girls), but it factors in. It factors in so much that women of color are dyeing their hair lighter to “Westernize” themselves – to match our standard of beauty. (I promise you Beyonce’s hair is not really that blonde.) It’s insulting to me that the media makes women feel they have to have lighter hair to a) Look more American and b) Be more beautiful. And it’s insulting on a very unconscious level. I love my black hair. I think it suits me a whole, whole lot. But it doesn’t stop me from thinking I’ll look lighter and prettier and better if it was blonde.

I think we equate blonde hair with lightness, purity, youth, innocence, and even things like angels and silk. And I think we equate dark hair with mystery, exotic places, maturity, heaviness or sexiness, and mischief. “We” being the unconscious parts of our minds that take in these secret messages constantly. (I’m not even sure where I would put red hair on this spectrum, but I think I would put it somewhere in-between, maybe more toward “exotic.”)

This isn’t what I think of hair at all. I think all types of hair are really awesome and beautiful. Hair itself is a really cool thing no matter its color or texture. But this is what I feel when I dig deep down into my secret impressions of hair color in the media. It bothers me that these impressions affect me, even in the context of my personal “history” with blonde. When it comes down to it, I’ll never have blonde hair. I won’t ever get to look like Laura Marling, or Tavi Gevinson, or the actress who played Fleur Delacour in Harry Potter, or Narcissus (in Greek mythology, the most beautiful person who ever lived) or Aphrodite (the Greek goddess of beauty), I can just bask in their golden-haired glory.

But when I think of how so much of the way you look is up to chance, to genetics, I start to forget why this matters in the first place. When I think of how silly images in the media are, I also start to forget. When I think about how all those beautiful scary blonde girls I know are just people like me, with less melanin in their hair, I forget even more. And when I think about how not one single person is going to like me, who I really am, more if my hair is yellow rather than black, I shrug my shoulders, and walk away from the mirror.


Posted on November/10/2012 With 8 notes
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fuckyeahtattoos:

iseegodinbirds:

Alright, I have a huge favor to ask of everyone.
My cousin, Kira, is 12 years old. She recently came home from school and felt tingling and numbness in her legs. Her mother went to take her to the hospital, but she could not stand up; she was paralyzed. My aunt quickly picked her up and rushed her to the emergency room. Three spinal taps later, they have found out that she has Guillain-Barre syndrome. This is an autoimmune disorder that is attacking her nerves. There is no cure for this at all, and she is going to have to go through physical therapy for the next six months to be able to walk again. Treatment will help, but there is no guarantee she will ever be herself again.
My aunt is a very, very strong woman, but she is also the breadwinner in the house. She cannot work while her daughter is in the hospital, and they recently were nearly homeless. She also has two other children at home. If you can help in any way, please do. They are scared that they are going to lose their home and not be able to pay for Kira’s physical therapy.
Here’s more information on Guillain-Barre Syndrome.
Here’s how you can donate.
Please reblog this and help them out.

Signal boost. Every dollar helps.

fuckyeahtattoos:

iseegodinbirds:

Alright, I have a huge favor to ask of everyone.

My cousin, Kira, is 12 years old. She recently came home from school and felt tingling and numbness in her legs. Her mother went to take her to the hospital, but she could not stand up; she was paralyzed. My aunt quickly picked her up and rushed her to the emergency room. Three spinal taps later, they have found out that she has Guillain-Barre syndrome. This is an autoimmune disorder that is attacking her nerves. There is no cure for this at all, and she is going to have to go through physical therapy for the next six months to be able to walk again. Treatment will help, but there is no guarantee she will ever be herself again.

My aunt is a very, very strong woman, but she is also the breadwinner in the house. She cannot work while her daughter is in the hospital, and they recently were nearly homeless. She also has two other children at home. If you can help in any way, please do. They are scared that they are going to lose their home and not be able to pay for Kira’s physical therapy.

Here’s more information on Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

Here’s how you can donate.

Please reblog this and help them out.

Signal boost. Every dollar helps.

Posted on October/21/2012 With 3,545 notes
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urhajos:

Choi Xooang

urhajos:

Choi Xooang

Posted on October/12/2012 With 1,591 notes
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tattr:

KÖFI
Strasbourg, France
www.kofi-olive.fr
Email: aubersubjekt@gmail.com

tattr:

KÖFI

Strasbourg, France

www.kofi-olive.fr

Email: aubersubjekt@gmail.com

Posted on October/12/2012 With 948 notes
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the-absolute-best-posts:

suitep

Ricky Watson of Littleton, Colorado wipes tears from his eyes after he thanked President Barack Obama for repealing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” at a campaign rally in Golden, Colorado, September 13. Watson was kicked out of the Air Force 25 years ago for being gay.

This is a great blog to follow, seriously

Posted on October/3/2012 With 38,061 notes
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Posted on October/2/2012 With 4,932 notes
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mudora17:

Just some practice - straight from my head to paper. 

*talent swoon*

mudora17:

Just some practice - straight from my head to paper. 

*talent swoon*

Posted on September/12/2012 With 23 notes
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